Chicago Botanic Garden

7th Annual Botanic Garden Art Festival Amdur Productions proudly announces the 7th annual Chicago Botanic Garden Art Festival this summer. The festival is located ½ hour north of Chicago in Glencoe and showcases the work of 95 unique artists in a pristine setting overlooking a lake, spectacular gardens and 385 acres of majesty. All of the artwork embodies a botanic theme, use or material. Festival-goers will have the opportunity to see the masters at work, with interactive art demos and booth chats taking place all weekend long! The festival opens at 4 pm June 30 with a special Chicago Botanic Garden Members Preview, and is then open to the public July 1 and 2. The preview party is exclusive for members of the Chicago Botanic Garden. The incredible artwork available for purchase at the Festival is rivaled only by the beauty of the setting. The 385-acre Chicago Botanic Garden features 27 breathtaking display gardens and four natural areas uniquely situated on nine islands surrounded by lakes. The Chicago Botanic Garden Art Festival adds to a day of exploring one of the Midwest’s most celebrated destinations! RSVP on Facebook Share on social mediachicago botanic garden 1The Warm Weather and Your Garden Tim Johnson — February 21, 2017 — 4 Comments The late February weather in Chicago has been a glorious time to be outside and work in the garden. But the unseasonably warm weather has also raised questions about the long-term effect on plants and what garden tasks are appropriate. It is best to hold off on doing any detailed clean up of garden beds as the mulch and leaves in the beds will provide some protection to any early growing perennials when the weather eventually turns cold again. Raking leaves off the lawn and cutting back perennials are all fine to do now providing your garden soil is not too wet. Snowdrops are blooming at the Garden. Early flowering bulbs like snowdrops that are in flower here at the Chicago Botanic Garden are very tolerant of the cold. Daffodil and tulip foliage is coming up; these might end up being damaged by a spell of cold weather, but this should not affect the spring flowers. You do not need to take any special maintenance steps to protect these plants. If you have some perennials that are growing in a warm area of the garden with more pronounced growth, they might benefit from a light layer of mulch. For the most part, though, there is nothing special for most gardeners to do in their perennial beds. This is great weather to prune but proceed with care. Spring flowering shrubs like viburnums, lilacs, and forsythia set their flower buds last year so pruning done at this time of year will remove flower buds and reduce the number of spring flowers. You can still prune—just be aware of the flower buds as you are pruning. Forsythia flowers along the stems while viburnums will have a flower bud at the ends of the stem. The dormant season, and in particular late winter, is the best time of year to complete rejuvenation pruning, which is the aggressive pruning of overgrown shrubs to bring them back into scale with the garden. Shrubs like hydrangea (except oak leaf hydrangea), potentilla, and spirea that flower on new wood respond well to pruning now too. For instance, I cut my Annabelle hydrangea back to the ground each spring. Any plants installed last summer or fall should have been mulched when they were planted. If they were not, then mulch them now to help mitigate the temperature swings in the soil and prevent frost heaving of any plants in spring. The freezing and thawing of the soil can push recently installed small plants such as 1-gallon perennials or ground covers that were grown in containers out of the soil as the weather transitions to spring. If we receive a good covering of snow, the snow itself will not harm plants unless it builds up on them and breaks branches. It is a good idea to brush plants off during a storm if you observe them getting weighted down. Later snowstorms are more likely to come in wet and heavy. Leave the plants alone if the snow has frozen on them to avoid breaking branches during the removal process. Enjoy the warm weather and the early blooms, both at the Chicago Botanic Garden and in your own backyard.Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) In Horticulture & Display Gardens “climate change”, early spring blooms, gardening tips, plant information, signs of spring, snowdrops, spring, spring flowers, spring pruningchicago botanic garden 2The late February weather in Chicago has been a glorious time to be outside and work in the garden. But the unseasonably warm weather has also raised questions about the long-term effect on plants and what garden tasks are appropriate. It is best to hold off on doing any detailed clean up of garden beds as the mulch and leaves in the beds will provide some protection to any early growing perennials when the weather eventually turns cold again. Raking leaves off the lawn and cutting back perennials are all fine to do now providing your garden soil is not too wet. Snowdrops are blooming at the Garden. Early flowering bulbs like snowdrops that are in flower here at the Chicago Botanic Garden are very tolerant of the cold. Daffodil and tulip foliage is coming up; these might end up being damaged by a spell of cold weather, but this should not affect the spring flowers. You do not need to take any special maintenance steps to protect these plants. If you have some perennials that are growing in a warm area of the garden with more pronounced growth, they might benefit from a light layer of mulch. For the most part, though, there is nothing special for most gardeners to do in their perennial beds. This is great weather to prune but proceed with care. Spring flowering shrubs like viburnums, lilacs, and forsythia set their flower buds last year so pruning done at this time of year will remove flower buds and reduce the number of spring flowers. You can still prune—just be aware of the flower buds as you are pruning. Forsythia flowers along the stems while viburnums will have a flower bud at the ends of the stem. The dormant season, and in particular late winter, is the best time of year to complete rejuvenation pruning, which is the aggressive pruning of overgrown shrubs to bring them back into scale with the garden. Shrubs like hydrangea (except oak leaf hydrangea), potentilla, and spirea that flower on new wood respond well to pruning now too. For instance, I cut my Annabelle hydrangea back to the ground each spring. Any plants installed last summer or fall should have been mulched when they were planted. If they were not, then mulch them now to help mitigate the temperature swings in the soil and prevent frost heaving of any plants in spring. The freezing and thawing of the soil can push recently installed small plants such as 1-gallon perennials or ground covers that were grown in containers out of the soil as the weather transitions to spring. If we receive a good covering of snow, the snow itself will not harm plants unless it builds up on them and breaks branches. It is a good idea to brush plants off during a storm if you observe them getting weighted down. Later snowstorms are more likely to come in wet and heavy. Leave the plants alone if the snow has frozen on them to avoid breaking branches during the removal process. Enjoy the warm weather and the early blooms, both at the Chicago Botanic Garden and in your own backyard.Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)chicago botanic garden 3REU PROGRAM Applications are now closed for the 2017 season. The REU 2017 Program will run June 8, 2017 to August 18, 2017. _________________________________________________ Dates of Interest; Thank you for applying to our program. We had over 300 applicants for our positions. Below is our proposed timeline for hiring applicants for this summer.  Feb 22nd – We will review of applicants; once all transcripts and Recommendations are in.  Mar 1st-7th – Mentors will interview potential applicants.  March 21st – Offers to be sent out.  The Chicago Botanic Garden, with colleagues from partner institutions, hosts a ten-week summer research experience. This program offers undergraduate participants an opportunity to explore a diverse array of scientific fields related to plant biology and conservation. Travel, room and board, and research costs are covered by the program. Participants also receive a $5,000 stipend.  Student work will be based out of our new, well-equipped laboratories in the Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Plant Conservation Science Center. Students will be trained in all stages of research, from hypothesis formulation through experimental design, data collection, analysis, and ultimately presentation of results through a public research symposium. Additionally, there may be opportunities to present at national scientific meetings or publish findings in peer-reviewed journals. REU interns will interact closely with doctoral and master’s degree students from the joint Chicago Botanic Garden–Northwestern University Graduate Program in Plant Biology and Conservation and other graduate programs. Participants will also be encouraged to serve as research mentors for teens attending Chicago Public Schools and participating in the Garden’s College First program. Interns will also participate in field trips, workshops, and professional development activities. For questions not answered on our website, contact info@cbgreu.org.   REU Site: Plant Biology & Conservation Research Experiences for Undergraduates – From Genes to Ecosystems. (Supported by NSF awards DBI-0353752, DBI-0648972, DBI-1062675 and DBI-1461007)

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