Miami Botanical Gardens

In 1962, the City of Miami Beach created the “Garden Center” on a vacant site opposite the Miami Beach Convention Center built in 1957. Operated then as a City park, the Garden was situated on the historic Collins Canal, an integral part of the beginnings of Miami Beach. In the early 1900s pioneer John S. Collins dug the canal to transport mangoes and avocados, then called alligator pears by boat to the Port of Miami from groves along what is now Pinetree Drive. In the 1920s pioneer Carl Fisher developed Lincoln Road, luxury hotels such as the Flamingo and the Nautilus with polo fields and golf courses. The Garden site was originally a golf course. By 1922 Miami Beach boasted the largest avocado and mango groves in the world, but Miami’s agricultural roots wouldn’t last much longer, sacrificed for the tourist trade. Tourism has long been a driving force in Miami Beach, but the City also experienced the impact of economic recessions, World Wars, and destructive hurricanes. The Garden had sadly deteriorated before the Art Deco renaissance of the 1980s and after Hurricane Andrew in 1992. A group of residents approached the City in 1996 to create the Miami Beach Garden Conservancy as a non-profit organization with a mission to restore the Garden. Today’s Miami Beach Botanical Garden is a public/private partnership, owned by the City of Miami Beach. The Garden has again become a dynamic venue for arts and cultural programming, environmental education and cultural tourism.miami botanical gardens 1(Source: mbgarden.org) Miami Beach Botanical Garden 2000 Convention Center Drive Miami Beach, FL 33139 673-7256 www.mbgarden.org Miami Beach Botanical Garden, a 2.6 urban greenspace at the heart of South Beach, was transformed in 2011 with a $1.2 Million landscape renovation designed by South Florida landscape architect Raymond Jungles. The new landscape showcases Florida native plants and trees, significant new water gardens, cascading fountains and a wetland with mangrove and pond apple trees, an expanded Great Lawn for corporate and social events, a welcoming entrance and event plaza, and enhanced lighting and pathways. The Garden offers free admission and is open Tuesday to Sunday from 9AM to 5PM.miami botanical gardens 2The garden was established in 1936 by Robert H. Montgomery (1872–1953), an accountant, attorney, and businessman with a passion for plant-collecting. The garden opened to the public in 1938. It was named after his good friend David Fairchild (1869–1954), one of the great plant explorers. Dr. Fairchild’s extensive travels brought more than 20,000 important plants to the United States, including mangos, alfalfa, nectarines, dates, horseradish, bamboos and flowering cherries. David Fairchild retired to Miami in 1935, but many plants still growing in the Garden were collected and planted by Dr. Fairchild, including a giant African baobab tree. With the guidance of an influential circle of friends, Montgomery pursued the dream of creating a botanical garden in Miami. He purchased the site, named it after Dr. Fairchild, and later deeded it in large part to Miami-Dade County.miami botanical gardens 3The Miami Beach Botanical Garden is a 2.6-acre urban greenspace in Miami Beach, Florida founded in 1962. It was transformed in 2011 with a $1.2 million landscape renovation designed by South Florida landscape architect Raymond Jungles. The new landscape showcases native Florida plants and trees including bromeliads, palms, cycad, orchids and many others. There is a Japanese garden, native garden and bio-swale, and water gardens including ponds, fountains, and a wetland with mangrove and pond apple trees. The renovation also expanded the Great Lawn area for corporate and social events, established a plant nursery and event plaza, and enhanced the night-time lights, entrance gate, and pathways.miami botanical gardens 49. Montgomery Botanical Center 2 reviews Botanical Gardens 11901 Old Cutler RdCoral Gables, FL 33156 Phone number 667-3800 Montgomery Botanical Center is a 120 acre garden, and it is such a private place that it is only open about once or twice a year for the public.  It is a nonprofit garden that was… read moremiami botanical gardens 5Miami Beach Botanical Garden, a 2.6 urban greenspace at the heart of South Beach, was transformed in 2011 with a $1.2 Million landscape renovation designed by South Florida landscape architect Raymond Jungles. The new landscape showcases Florida native plants and trees, significant new water gardens, cascading fountains and a wetland with mangrove and pond apple trees, an expanded Great Lawn for corporate and social events, a welcoming entrance and event plaza, and enhanced lighting and pathways. The Garden offers free admission and is open Tuesday to Sunday from 9AM to 5PM.miami botanical gardens 6Compared to most botanical gardens the Miami Beach version is miniscule. Still, it offers a lovely, tranquil setting that is very much worth a visit.miami botanical gardens 7Military Discount Fairchild offers active military personnel and veterans free admission year-round. We also participate in the Blue Star Museums program, which offers free admission to families of active military personnel through Labor Day (September 1, 2014). Culture Shock Miami We participate in Culture Shock Miami,which offers discounted tickets to Fairchild for participating students between the ages 13-22.miami botanical gardens 8The mission of the Miami Beach Botanical Garden is to promote environmental enjoyment, stewardship and sustainability through education, the arts, and interaction with the natural world. Our garden is a unique, subtropical oasis of beauty and tranquility within an urban setting—a community resource that refreshes, inspires and engages our visitors.miami botanical gardens 9One of the main features of the Miami Beach Botanical Garden is its Japanese Garden. This tranquil corner of the garden is defined by a red lacquered bridge spanning a quiet pond dotted with water lilies. Stone lanterns stand among the plantings based on the principles of Feng shui, where specific orientation and placing of certain elements helps to capture the energy and spirit of nature. Significant plantings here include the red powder puff shrub (Calliandra haematocephala), golden trumpet tree (Tabebuia caribea), and various types of tropical bamboo.miami botanical gardens 10Built by agricultural industrialist James Deering in 1916, Vizcaya Museum & Gardens features a Main House, ten acres of formal gardens, and a rockland hammock. The gardens are said to be among the most grand and beautiful you will ever see.miami botanical gardens 11Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden offers educational programs to all age groups. Simple horticultural study, art and painting, photography, and culinary courses are offered. More than five different childhood educational programs are offered at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden for kindergarten to 12th grade. Through scientific investigation and garden exploration, students learn the fundamentals of botany, landscape, and nature. The programs included are the Explorer Program, Discovery Program, Adventure Program, Planet Mobile Program, and Homeschool Program. Through one such program, The Fairchild Challenge, around 20,000 students at more than 120 K-12 schools across Miami-Dade County plant, maintain, grow and learn in their school gardens. This program offers garden consultations and teacher workshops as well as provides school garden grants. They include staff supervision, guided activities, and hands-on learning experiences. Graduate students can apply for Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden’s graduate fellowship. This fellowship trains students in “systematics, ecology, evolutionary biology, and genetics” and more.miami botanical gardens 12(Source: pinecrest-fl.gov) Pinecrest Gardens 11000 Southwest 57th Avenue Pinecrest, FL. 669-6942 www.pinecrest-fl.gov Located on the former site of Parrot Jungle, Pinecrest Gardens features huge banyan trees and lush vegetation. Play areas include a large and shady playground, petting zoo, butterfly exhibit, and the Splash ‘n Play water area open to children ages 2-12. Many stone tables are located throughout the park where you can have a quiet picnic lunch.miami botanical gardens 13(Source: key-biscayne.com) Crandon Gardens 4000 Crandon Boulevard Key Biscayne, FL www.key-biscayne.com Crandon Gardens, hidden away in Key Biscayne’s Crandon Park, is the former site of MetroZoo. It’s made up of over 200 acres of lush vegetation and lakes. This area grew wild after the zoo moved away, but has since been manicured and renovated to perfection. There’s a large variety of birds living there like peacocks, geese, ibises, turkeys, herons, swans, and many more. There are also lakes with fountains, and swinging benches as well.miami botanical gardens 14Very nice and peaceful Japanese garden along the MacArthur causeway, right near Downtown Miami. It's small but there still quite a bit to see. A nice pond and waterfall, and garden.… read moremiami botanical gardens 15Best Corned Beef And Cabbage In MiamiSt. Patrick's Day, while originating in Ireland, is celebrated across the United States and even in other parts of the world. Miami and other parts of South Florida are renowned for the eclectic mix of different cultures and food. And when it comes to St. Patrick's Day, the bars, nightclubs, and restaurants pull out all the stops to create a little bit of Ireland in South Florida.We are a small Garden, just 2.6 acres, with a very big mission! We call ourselves an urban oasis in the middle of the glitz and neon of South Beach, a place where locals and visitors can come and enjoy the numerous cultural and artisitic programs that the Garden has to offer. Created as a Miami Beach city park in 1962, the Garden was rejuvenated in the fall of 2011 with a $1.2 Million landscape renovation by acclaimed South Florida landscape architect Raymond Jungles.We invite you to discover the new features of the Garden – a wetland with red mangrove and pond apple trees, an expansive water garden with cascading oolite fountain, a welcoming entrance plaza, and diverse collection of flowering trees, palms, cycads, orchids, bromeliads and Florida native species.

Add a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *