Patio Tile

Tweet // USE PATIO TILES TO CREATE THE PERFECT OUTDOOR OASIS The outdoor patio area is an important part of your home that should feel like an extension of your interior design. It is a functional place for gathering with family and friends, relaxing after a long day, and entertaining on weekends. By incorporating beautiful, long-lasting patio tiles, you can add vibrancy and personality to this important space. Here are some tips for incorporating tile into your outdoor oasis. Add Tile to Your Patio Walls The addition of walls or half-walls can help define your outdoor space. Depending on how high the walls are, they can give your patio a private, intimate feel. By adding a colorful mosaic tile or pattern to your walls, you can make the space vibrant and inviting. Glass mosaic tiles are eye catching, and the variety of colors available allows you to add touches of personality to your outdoor space. Go Natural with Wood-look Tile Do you love the look of hardwood but want the durability and easy maintenance of tile for your outdoor space? Wood-look tiles offer the best of both worlds. Visually, they offer a similar look to a deck, but the tile will hold up to moisture and can be swept clean easily. You also won’t have to worry about restaining tiles. With proper sealant, your wood-look tiles will look like new for a long time. Personalize Your Patio with Decorative Tile Small details can make a huge difference in any outdoor space. Whether you use patio tiles on your floor or walls, you can incorporate decorative tiles for a unique, personalized look. Do you have a built-in grill on your deck? Why not incorporate some stainless tiles in a brick-joint pattern around the facade to create an industrial look? For a unique design on your patio, instead of using precisely cut square tiles, choose natural-looking shapes that blend with your outdoor environment. Color Your World Your outdoor patio space is a perfect spot to incorporate color into your design. You can opt for a neutral tile and then add pops of color with plants or accent vases. You can also go with a colorful tile design for a tropical, Caribbean feel. Remember that the use of different colors will make the area more interesting to the eye. Using complementary colors can help to break up the monotonous look of single-color tiles, especially if you’re using square tiles. Try incorporating vibrant mosaic tiles on your tabletop to instantly brighten your space. Remember that your patio should match the rest of your home design, reflect your personality, and be built to last. Make sure your tiles are manufactured for use outdoors before you move ahead. This will ensure that your perfect patio will last for years with low maintenance.patio tile 1Six keys to successful outdoor tile setting Use high-quality materials only. Expensive tile won’t necessarily outlast moderately priced tile, but with thin-set, grout, sealer and caulk, you get what you pay for. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Even the best setting materials won’t perform as promised unless you mix and use them as instructed. Apply tile only to a stable, well-drained slab. A slab with places for puddles or ever-growing cracks is no place for tile. Allow the tile to expand and contract without cracking by placing expansion joints no more than 16 ft. apart and anywhere the tile meets a vertical surface like steps or the house’s foundation. Don’t give water places to enter or hide. That means densely packed and sealed grout joints, caulked expansion joints and no empty pockets in the thin-set. Don’t delay maintenance. If grout cracks or a tile comes loose, replace it before a small problem becomes a big one. Preparation and good materials make a successful job.patio tile 2Six keys to successful outdoor tile setting Use high-quality materials only. Expensive tile won’t necessarily outlast moderately priced tile, but with thin-set, grout, sealer and caulk, you get what you pay for. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Even the best setting materials won’t perform as promised unless you mix and use them as instructed. Apply tile only to a stable, well-drained slab. A slab with places for puddles or ever-growing cracks is no place for tile. Allow the tile to expand and contract without cracking by placing expansion joints no more than 16 ft. apart and anywhere the tile meets a vertical surface like steps or the house’s foundation. Don’t give water places to enter or hide. That means densely packed and sealed grout joints, caulked expansion joints and no empty pockets in the thin-set. Don’t delay maintenance. If grout cracks or a tile comes loose, replace it before a small problem becomes a big one.patio tile 3Use high-quality materials only. Expensive tile won’t necessarily outlast moderately priced tile, but with thin-set, grout, sealer and caulk, you get what you pay for. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions. Even the best setting materials won’t perform as promised unless you mix and use them as instructed. Apply tile only to a stable, well-drained slab. A slab with places for puddles or ever-growing cracks is no place for tile. Allow the tile to expand and contract without cracking by placing expansion joints no more than 16 ft. apart and anywhere the tile meets a vertical surface like steps or the house’s foundation. Don’t give water places to enter or hide. That means densely packed and sealed grout joints, caulked expansion joints and no empty pockets in the thin-set. Don’t delay maintenance. If grout cracks or a tile comes loose, replace it before a small problem becomes a big one.patio tile 4Next Up How to Tile a Porch Step-by-step directions for how to tile a screened-in porch from the planning stage to the polishing stage. How to Patch Concrete Porch Steps How to Stamp a Concrete Porch Floor Rock Solid hosts Derek Stearns and Dean Marsico show how to use overlay and a pattern stamp to rework a cracked and peeling concrete porch floor. The result is a stylish porch surface resembling slate at a fraction of the cost. How to Assemble a Pre-Engineered Porch System All of the pieces in a pre-engineered porch system are milled and cut in the factory and shipped with all necessary hardware, making it relatively easy to add a three-season porch to your home. How To Restore a Porch Railing Learn how to restore a water-damaged original handrail around a porch, with a new beveled bottom rail to keep the water from damaging the spindles. How to Build a Travertine Tile Patio Add a touch of elegance to a backyard with this travertine tile patio. How to Install Porch Flooring The first phase of a front-porch restoration is to complete construction of the porch floor, including support and decking. Here’s how to do it. Updating a Porch With PVC This DIY Download will provide tips on updating a porch with PVC. How to Screen in a Porch Screening in a porch beneath an existing room provides a comfortable place to sit outside and keeps away the bugs. How to Repair Concrete Use these instructions to fix small holes and cracks in a concrete patio, driveway or garage floor.patio tile 5How to Tile a Porch Step-by-step directions for how to tile a screened-in porch from the planning stage to the polishing stage. How to Patch Concrete Porch Steps How to Stamp a Concrete Porch Floor Rock Solid hosts Derek Stearns and Dean Marsico show how to use overlay and a pattern stamp to rework a cracked and peeling concrete porch floor. The result is a stylish porch surface resembling slate at a fraction of the cost. How to Assemble a Pre-Engineered Porch System All of the pieces in a pre-engineered porch system are milled and cut in the factory and shipped with all necessary hardware, making it relatively easy to add a three-season porch to your home. How To Restore a Porch Railing Learn how to restore a water-damaged original handrail around a porch, with a new beveled bottom rail to keep the water from damaging the spindles. How to Build a Travertine Tile Patio Add a touch of elegance to a backyard with this travertine tile patio. How to Install Porch Flooring The first phase of a front-porch restoration is to complete construction of the porch floor, including support and decking. Here’s how to do it. Updating a Porch With PVC This DIY Download will provide tips on updating a porch with PVC. How to Screen in a Porch Screening in a porch beneath an existing room provides a comfortable place to sit outside and keeps away the bugs. How to Repair Concrete Use these instructions to fix small holes and cracks in a concrete patio, driveway or garage floor.patio tile 6Pouring a concrete slab is a major project in itself and we won’t explain how to do it here. Whether you do it yourself or hire a contractor, here are the requirements for a lasting, tile-ready slab: Patio slabs are typically 3-1/2 in. thick and reinforced with steel mesh (if anything). But because strength and crack resistance are so important for this project, we recommend a slab 5 to 6 in. thick, reinforced with a 2-ft. x 2-ft. grid of 1/2-in. rebar. For good surface drainage, the slab should slope 1/4 in. per running foot. A 16-ft. long slab, for example, would be 4 in. lower on one end than the other. Place isolation or control joints in the slab where they’ll coincide with expansion joints in the tile (more on that below). If you hire a contractor to pour the slab, make sure curing compounds aren’t used. Curing compounds increase the strength of concrete by slowing the curing process, but they also prevent tile-setting materials from bonding well to the slab. The slab should have a broomed finish, not a smooth-troweled surface. Concrete shrinks and gains strength for weeks after it’s poured. So wait at least four weeks before setting tile on a new slab. And any concrete, new or old, should stay dry for at least three days before you begin tile work.

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