Shades Definition

Historical Examples His plumage is of a pale yellow, marked with brown and nest-coloured zig-zag patches and shades. The Desert World Arthur Mangin The shades of evening will be on us in an hour and our dark mantles will excite no attention. “Unto Caesar” Baroness Emmuska Orczy The same position on deck the boys found none the less attractive when the shades of night had fallen. The Delta of the Triple Elevens William Elmer Bachman Roses of all sizes and colors and shades of color were there. Mizora: A Prophecy Mary E. Bradley The longer Huldbrand sought Undine beneath the shades of night, and failed to find her, the more anxious and confused he became. Undine Friedrich de la Motte Fouqueshades definition 1shade A. N1. (= area of darkness) → sombra fin the shade → a la sombra35 degrees in the shade → 35 grados a la sombrato put sb in the shade (fig) → hacer sombra a algnto put sth in the shade (fig) → dejar algo en la sombra2. → tono m, matiz m (fig) → matiz mall shades of opinion are represented → está representada la gama entera de opiniones3. (Art) → sombra f4. shades (= sunglasses) → gafas fpl de sol5. (= lampshade) → pantalla f; (= eye-shade) → visera f (US) (= blind) → persiana f6. (= small quantity) → poquito m, tantito m (LAm)just a shade more → un poquito más7. (liter) (= ghost) → fantasma m8. (= reminder) shades of Professor Dodd! → ¡eso recuerda al profesor Dodd!B. VT1. (= protect from light) → dar sombra athe beaches are shaded by palm trees → las palmeras dan sombra a las playasshe put up her hand to shade her eyes (from the sun) → levantó la mano para protegerse los ojos (del sol)2. (Art) (= shade in) → sombrearshade away VI + ADV = shade off Bshade in VT + ADV → sombrearshade offA. VT + ADV (Art) → degradarB. VI + ADV → cambiar poco a poco (into hasta hacerse) → transformarse gradualmente (into en) blue that shades off into black → azul que se transforma or se funde gradualmente en negroshades definition 2noun1. hue, tone, colour, tint The walls were painted in two shades of green.2. shadow, cover, screen, shadows, shelter, coolness, shadiness Exotic trees provide welcome shade.3. dash, trace, hint, suggestion, suspicion, small amount, semblance There was a shade of irony in her voice.4. nuance, difference, degree, graduation, subtlety, gradation, modulation the capacity to convey subtle shades of meaning5. screen, covering, cover, blind, curtain, shield, veil, canopy She left the shades down and the lights off.6. (Literary) ghost, spirit, shadow, phantom, spectre, manes, apparition, eidolon His writing benefits from the shade of Lincoln hovering over his shoulder.shades definition 3A. N1. (= area of darkness) → sombra fin the shade → a la sombra35 degrees in the shade → 35 grados a la sombrato put sb in the shade (fig) → hacer sombra a algnto put sth in the shade (fig) → dejar algo en la sombra2. → tono m, matiz m (fig) → matiz mall shades of opinion are represented → está representada la gama entera de opiniones3. (Art) → sombra f4. shades (= sunglasses) → gafas fpl de sol5. (= lampshade) → pantalla f; (= eye-shade) → visera f (US) (= blind) → persiana f6. (= small quantity) → poquito m, tantito m (LAm)just a shade more → un poquito más7. (liter) (= ghost) → fantasma m8. (= reminder) shades of Professor Dodd! → ¡eso recuerda al profesor Dodd!shades definition 4shade 1. na. → ombrain the shade → all’ombrato put in the shade (fig) → mettere in ombra, oscurareb. (also lampshade) → paralume mc. (also eyeshade) → visierad. (Am) (window shade) → tapparellae. shades npl (Am) (sunglasses) → occhiali mpl da solef. (of colour) → tonalità f inv, sfumatura (fig) (of meaning, opinion) → sfumaturaseveral shades darker/lighter → di tonalità parecchio più scura/chiarathis lipstick comes in several shades → questo rossetto è disponibile in diverse gradazioni di coloreg. (small quantity) just a shade more → un tantino di piùa shade bigger → un tantino più grande2. vt (from sun, light) → riparareto shade one’s eyes from the sun → ripararsi gli occhi dal soleshade in vt + adv (drawing) → ombreggiareshades definition 51. na. → ombrain the shade → all’ombrato put in the shade (fig) → mettere in ombra, oscurareb. (also lampshade) → paralume mc. (also eyeshade) → visierad. (Am) (window shade) → tapparellae. shades npl (Am) (sunglasses) → occhiali mpl da solef. (of colour) → tonalità f inv, sfumatura (fig) (of meaning, opinion) → sfumaturaseveral shades darker/lighter → di tonalità parecchio più scura/chiarathis lipstick comes in several shades → questo rossetto è disponibile in diverse gradazioni di coloreg. (small quantity) just a shade more → un tantino di piùa shade bigger → un tantino più grandeshades definition 6Middle English schade, Kentish ssed, from late Old English scead “partial darkness; shelter, protection,” also partly from sceadu “shade, shadow, darkness; shady place, arbor, protection from glare or heat,” both from Proto-Germanic *skadwaz (cf. Old Saxon skado, Middle Dutch scade, Dutch schaduw, Old High German scato, German Schatten, Gothic skadus), from PIE *skot-wo-, from root *skot- “dark, shade” (cf. Greek skotos “darkness, gloom,” Albanian kot “darkness,” Old Irish scath, Old Welsh scod, Breton squeut “darkness,” Gaelic sgath “shade, shadow, shelter”). Figurative use in reference to comparative obscurity is from 1640s. Meaning “a ghost” is from 1610s; dramatic (or mock-dramatic) expression “shades of _____” to invoke or acknowledge a memory is from 1818, from the “ghost” sense. Meaning “lamp cover” is from 1780. Sense of “window blind” first recorded 1845. Meaning “cover to protect the eyes” is from 1801. Meaning “grade of color” first recorded 1680s; that of “degree or gradiation of darkness in a color” is from 1680s (cf. nuance, from French nue “cloud”). Meaning “small amount or degree” is from 1782.shades definition 7shade n. Middle English schade, Kentish ssed, from late Old English scead “partial darkness; shelter, protection,” also partly from sceadu “shade, shadow, darkness; shady place, arbor, protection from glare or heat,” both from Proto-Germanic *skadwaz (cf. Old Saxon skado, Middle Dutch scade, Dutch schaduw, Old High German scato, German Schatten, Gothic skadus), from PIE *skot-wo-, from root *skot- “dark, shade” (cf. Greek skotos “darkness, gloom,” Albanian kot “darkness,” Old Irish scath, Old Welsh scod, Breton squeut “darkness,” Gaelic sgath “shade, shadow, shelter”). Figurative use in reference to comparative obscurity is from 1640s. Meaning “a ghost” is from 1610s; dramatic (or mock-dramatic) expression “shades of _____” to invoke or acknowledge a memory is from 1818, from the “ghost” sense. Meaning “lamp cover” is from 1780. Sense of “window blind” first recorded 1845. Meaning “cover to protect the eyes” is from 1801. Meaning “grade of color” first recorded 1680s; that of “degree or gradiation of darkness in a color” is from 1680s (cf. nuance, from French nue “cloud”). Meaning “small amount or degree” is from 1782. v. c.1400, “to screen from light or heat,” from shade (n.). From 1520s as “to cast a shadow over;” figurative use in this sense from 1580s. Sense in painting and drawing is from 1797. In reference to colors, 1819. Related: Shaded; shading.shades definition 8n. Middle English schade, Kentish ssed, from late Old English scead “partial darkness; shelter, protection,” also partly from sceadu “shade, shadow, darkness; shady place, arbor, protection from glare or heat,” both from Proto-Germanic *skadwaz (cf. Old Saxon skado, Middle Dutch scade, Dutch schaduw, Old High German scato, German Schatten, Gothic skadus), from PIE *skot-wo-, from root *skot- “dark, shade” (cf. Greek skotos “darkness, gloom,” Albanian kot “darkness,” Old Irish scath, Old Welsh scod, Breton squeut “darkness,” Gaelic sgath “shade, shadow, shelter”). Figurative use in reference to comparative obscurity is from 1640s. Meaning “a ghost” is from 1610s; dramatic (or mock-dramatic) expression “shades of _____” to invoke or acknowledge a memory is from 1818, from the “ghost” sense. Meaning “lamp cover” is from 1780. Sense of “window blind” first recorded 1845. Meaning “cover to protect the eyes” is from 1801. Meaning “grade of color” first recorded 1680s; that of “degree or gradiation of darkness in a color” is from 1680s (cf. nuance, from French nue “cloud”). Meaning “small amount or degree” is from 1782. v. c.1400, “to screen from light or heat,” from shade (n.). From 1520s as “to cast a shadow over;” figurative use in this sense from 1580s. Sense in painting and drawing is from 1797. In reference to colors, 1819. Related: Shaded; shading.shades definition 9Show more   Show less  shade – definition and synonyms    What are red words?Using the thesaurus CloseWhat are red words? 90% of the time, speakers of English use just 7,500 words in speech and writing. These words appear in red, and are graded with stars. One-star words are frequent, two-star words are more frequent, and three-star words are the most frequent. CloseThesaurusThe thesaurus of synonyms and related words is fully integrated into the dictionary. Click on the thesaurus category heading under the button in an entry to see the synonyms and related words for that meaning.more noun  /ʃeɪd/Closesingularshadepluralshades Contribute to our Open Dictionary

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