Tree Benches

Step Two // How to Build a Tree Bench Create a Template Photo by Matthew Benson You’ll make the bench from six sections of equal size. Measure the tree’s diameter in inches at the seat’s height (16 to 18 inches). Add 6 inches for a mature tree; add 12 inches for a young tree, to allow for growth. Divide the total by 1.75 to find the length of the short sides of the inner seat boards. Mark this length on a strip of scrap lumber or cardboard, and cut the ends at opposing 30-degree angles so that the opposite side is longer. Cut five more template pieces to size. Check for fit by joining the pieces around the tree using clamps or scrap lumber, and adjust as needed.tree benches 1Tree Benches These look well, don’t they? Thanks to this collection, even the most demanding customers will be able to find something for themselves. After getting to know all these solutions, you will definitely find it much easier to make a right choice. Are you ready to buy one of such tree benches? Ideas By Raquel Stonetree benches 2Tree Benches These look well, don’t they? Thanks to this collection, even the most demanding customers will be able to find something for themselves. After getting to know all these solutions, you will definitely find it much easier to make a right choice. Are you ready to buy one of such tree benches?tree benches 3You’ll make the bench from six sections of equal size. Measure the tree’s diameter in inches at the seat’s height (16 to 18 inches). Add 6 inches for a mature tree; add 12 inches for a young tree, to allow for growth. Divide the total by 1.75 to find the length of the short sides of the inner seat boards. Mark this length on a strip of scrap lumber or cardboard, and cut the ends at opposing 30-degree angles so that the opposite side is longer. Cut five more template pieces to size. Check for fit by joining the pieces around the tree using clamps or scrap lumber, and adjust as needed.tree benches 4These look well, don’t they? Thanks to this collection, even the most demanding customers will be able to find something for themselves. After getting to know all these solutions, you will definitely find it much easier to make a right choice. Are you ready to buy one of such tree benches?tree benches 5We end today’s post by taking a look at tree benches that defy expectation. For a unique look, skip the wrap-around approach and opt for an L-shaped bench, as shown in the modern yard below.tree benches 6Step Six // How to Build a Tree Bench Cut the Pieces Photo by Matthew Benson The leg assemblies consist of outer and inner legs sandwiched between two stringers. Cut 12 legs from 2×6 framing to the height of the bench, minus the thickness of the seat boards. (If the ground around the tree is uneven, make the legs longer so that you can level the bench later by digging out soil beneath them.) Measure the distance from the midpoint of an inner seat board at its cut end to the long point of the outer seat board. Subtract 3 inches to leave room for a reveal and an apron. Cut 12 stringers from decking to this length. Cut a 30-degree miter off the front end of each stringer, where the apron will be attached, as shown in the illustration.tree benches 7Step Seven // How to Build a Tree Bench Mark and Drill Bolt Holes Photo by Matthew Benson Using a Speed Square, measure 2 inches from the front edge of an outer leg, and make a vertical mark on the flat side of the leg at this spot. Repeat for the other side of the leg. Sandwich the leg between two stringers so that the pieces are flush at the top, with the long ends flat against the leg and lined up with the marks you made. Slip the inner leg between the stringers, and use a spacer to keep it parallel to and at least a few inches from the outer leg. (Don’t move the inner leg too far back; you don’t want it to rest on any tree roots.) Clamp the pieces to a work surface on top of a scrap block of wood. Drill two vertically aligned 3⁄8-inch holes through the stringers and outer leg, as shown. Then drill two staggered, diagonally offset holes through the stringers and inner leg.tree benches 8Step Ten // How to Build a Tree Bench Attach the Remaining Sections Photo by Matthew Benson Place the two sets of joined sections on opposite sides of the tree. Place the remaining seat boards between them, on top of the exposed halves of the leg assemblies. Adjust the joints, and fasten the outer three seat boards to the stringers, as described in the last step.tree benches 9How to Build a Tree Bench Shopping List 1. strips of scrap lumber or cardboard to make a template and spacers 2. ¼-inch-thick scrap lumber or shims 3. 5⁄4×6 decking by Kebony for the seat and stringers for the leg assemblies. Measure your tree so that you know how much to buy. 4. 2×6 framing by Kebony for the backrest, legs, and apron 3⁄8×4-inch galvanized carriage bolts 5. 3⁄8-inch galvanized locking washers 6. 3⁄8-inch nuts 7. 2-inch stainless-steel deck screws 8. 3-inch stainless-steel deck screws 9. wood glue ×tree benches 10How to Build a Tree Bench Shopping List 1. strips of scrap lumber or cardboard to make a template and spacers 2. ¼-inch-thick scrap lumber or shims 3. 5⁄4×6 decking by Kebony for the seat and stringers for the leg assemblies. Measure your tree so that you know how much to buy. 4. 2×6 framing by Kebony for the backrest, legs, and apron 3⁄8×4-inch galvanized carriage bolts 5. 3⁄8-inch galvanized locking washers 6. 3⁄8-inch nuts 7. 2-inch stainless-steel deck screws 8. 3-inch stainless-steel deck screws 9. wood gluetree benches 11Scroll Tubular Iron Tree Bench This stylish bench can be set freely encircled tree, to create a comfortable and good looking place to seat. It is made of decorative bent metal with dark brown, powder coat finish. Resistant to fade, scratch or rust.tree benches 12Architectural Metal Tree Bench This elegant, a bit rustic tree bench can be easy install around the three. Its sturdy, stainless steel construction has a warm brown, powder – coated finish, resistant for rust, scratches or weather conditions.tree benches 13Scroll Tubular Iron Tree Bench This stylish bench can be set freely encircled tree, to create a comfortable and good looking place to seat. It is made of decorative bent metal with dark brown, powder coat finish. Resistant to fade, scratch or rust.Found by JennaGarcia+138tree benches 14Architectural Metal Tree Bench This elegant, a bit rustic tree bench can be easy install around the three. Its sturdy, stainless steel construction has a warm brown, powder – coated finish, resistant for rust, scratches or weather conditions.Found by CampbellMonica+4tree benches 15With a similar look, the Tree Hugger Bench from Brookstone adds wrap-around style to your tree of choice. Also like the bench above, this selection can be yours for around $229.tree benches 16When reader Sarah Schramm asked us for directions to make a tree bench, we couldn’t turn her down. This comfy, stay-cool spot has room for the entire family. To build it, TOH senior technical editor Mark Powers chose a specially impregnated and thermally modified pine that’s as hard and dense as an exotic hardwood, and resists decay and termites, too. (You’ll have to drill pilot holes for every screw to be driven through it.) Put your bench together, and you’ll enjoy lounging on it with a favorite book all summer long.tree benches 17The leg assemblies consist of outer and inner legs sandwiched between two stringers. Cut 12 legs from 2×6 framing to the height of the bench, minus the thickness of the seat boards. (If the ground around the tree is uneven, make the legs longer so that you can level the bench later by digging out soil beneath them.) Measure the distance from the midpoint of an inner seat board at its cut end to the long point of the outer seat board. Subtract 3 inches to leave room for a reveal and an apron. Cut 12 stringers from decking to this length. Cut a 30-degree miter off the front end of each stringer, where the apron will be attached, as shown in the illustration.tree benches 18Using a Speed Square, measure 2 inches from the front edge of an outer leg, and make a vertical mark on the flat side of the leg at this spot. Repeat for the other side of the leg. Sandwich the leg between two stringers so that the pieces are flush at the top, with the long ends flat against the leg and lined up with the marks you made. Slip the inner leg between the stringers, and use a spacer to keep it parallel to and at least a few inches from the outer leg. (Don’t move the inner leg too far back; you don’t want it to rest on any tree roots.) Clamp the pieces to a work surface on top of a scrap block of wood. Drill two vertically aligned 3⁄8-inch holes through the stringers and outer leg, as shown. Then drill two staggered, diagonally offset holes through the stringers and inner leg.

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